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1997 Wis Eth Bd 07 - EMPLOYMENT CONFLICTING WITH OFFICIAL RESPONSIBILITIES; LOBBYING LAW; USE OF STATE’S TIME, FACILITIES, SUPPLIES AND SERVICES

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The Ethics Board advises:

   (1) that neither the Ethics Code nor lobbying law restrict an individual from
         running for a partisan elective state office nor establishing a personal
         campaign committee for the individual’s candidacy while the individual
         is a full-time appointed state public official;

   (2) that the lobbying law provides that an individual may not solicit or
         accept from a lobbyist or a lobbying principal a contribution for the individual’s
         candidacy for a partisan elective state office except between June
         1 and the day of the general election in the year of the candidate’s
         election;

   (3) that the Ethics Code provides that a state public official may not rely on
         the state’s time, facilities, services, or supplies in soliciting campaign
         contributions;

   (4) that although not compelled by the Ethics Code, a state public official
         should not solicit or accept campaign contributions from individuals,
         businesses, or organizations that (a) are subject to regulation by, or apply
         for contracts with, or grants or loans from, the official’s agency; (b) are
         members of the immediate family of such individuals; or (c) are associated
         with such businesses or organizations as principal shareholders,
         officers, or directors; and

   (5) that although not compelled by the Ethics Code, a full-time appointed
         state public official should not simultaneously hold appointed state public
         office and seek election to a different government position without first
         obtaining the appointing authority’s informed consent that the individual’s
         candidacy will neither unduly affect the performance of official
         duties nor adversely and unduly affect the effectiveness of the individual’s
         agency.

(September 5, 1997)